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Our Services: Document Digitization

Practical Solutions For Documents Between One Day Old And 3 Centuries Old

Advantage Archives Shape

Document Imaging

Digitization Of Documents, Books, Vital Records, Correspondence & More.

Printed, handwritten, and even drawn content contained in the city, county, state, personal, and even business documents provide invaluable insight into the people, places, events, and accounts in a “snapshot of time”. Whether your document is a day old, or 200 years old, Advantage has the technology, experience and expertise to provide you with archiving and access options that will fit your institution or organizations specific needs.

Advantage has been providing our partners with archival and access solutions for records of historical interest, local history, and business records across the United States, and is uniquely positioned to accommodate both preservation and digital access solutions for the content contained on paper that is at risk of being lost due to handling and the erosion of time.

We do not have an “out-of-the-box” approach to digital conversions. Our experience substantiates the common-sense premise that every partner’s needs are somewhat different, even within the same industry, government agency and application area. As a result, every Advantage project is customized and tailored to specific partner requirements.

Advantage Archives Shape

Historical Documents

Historical documents contain important clues to our past and put the events of the past into perspective. Documents of “historical significance” is a subjective concept, as almost any document, journal, yearbook, and even a receipt will tell a story and make a tangible connection to an era gone by. The words and images provide insight into the lives of previous generations. They help us understand history from a personal perspective: How did people interact? What was the attitude of the day? What were common business practices? How much did a loaf of bread cost? Who lived in my old house? When was my town incorporated? What was my grandmother like in high school? What other relatives lived near my uncle’s farm? What was the population of my county when my great grandfather migrated here? Almost anything printed on paper can paint a picture of the way our family, community, business, state, or country existed at almost any time in history. Amongst the most common requests Advantage gets for document conversion projects includes family histories, vital records, deeds, laws, maps, war records, and photographs.

Many government agencies have done a fantastic job in maintaining older governmental records and storing them in appropriate conditions, however public access to these documents remains limited. These include birth records, death certificates, marriage documents, land records, maps, etc. that were often recorded in large permanently bound archival fibers.

Advantage Archives Shape

Our Approach

Our successful project management methodologies, preservation, and conversion experience on documents old and new are backed up by outstanding references in government and almost every paper-intensive industry. Methods range from single page processing with manual data entry to high-speed OCR / ICR, forms processing and media conversions. Our web-based document hosting affords companies the ability to archive and process data on a real-time basis. Secure access is available to authorized users from any location. We fully administer our sites for backup, software and hardware upgrades, security monitoring, etc.

As with any major project, the key to creating the comfort zone you need to get started is by breaking the many moving parts into smaller, more manageable pieces. Identifying, sorting, organizing, scanning boxes and boxes of paper documents into a logical system easy for all the stakeholders to use is a major undertaking.

The basic steps of this process will include some or all of the following:

  • Inventorying of documents that need to be converted
  • Boxing and transportation of required paper documents
  • Preparing documents for scanning (removing staples, paper clips, ragged edges, etc.)
  • Scanning paper documents to agreed-upon format
  • Indexing to specifications that make sense for your organization or institution
  • Optical Character Recognition (OCR) to permit easy search on scanned documents
  • Loading indexed, scanned images to a Community History Archive or other document management system
  • Return or destruction of the scanned documents
Advantage Archives Shape

Why Digitize?

You may have questions regarding the digitization of your microfilm collection… Let us give you some answers!

  • A Digital Archive Will Save Time
  • It Will Improve The Accuracy Of Research
  • It Will Help Preserve The Physical Microfilm
  • It Can Protect Your Previous Investment In Microfilm
  • It Provides Valuable Patron & Community Service

A Digital Archive Will Save Time

Keyword searching allows library staff and patrons to find information within seconds of typing in a name or search term. Less time spent researching by thumbing through pages of newspapers or microfilm is more time spent assisting patrons & working on other projects or programs for the library.

For example: Patron A calls the library looking for “John Smith’s” obituary believing “John Smith” passed away between 1910–1920. Reference staff spends two weeks flipping through one page at a time finding every John Smith that passed between 1910–1920. Patron A calls back and says I’m sorry it was between 1900–1907. Three weeks have been lost to researching an obituary. Keyword searching allows phrase searching for every newspaper page containing the phrase “John Smith”. Once that term has been searched, reference staff just has to click through each indexed year in their database from 1910–1920. Those years will be filtered by the search term “John Smith” (only the articles containing the term “John Smith” will appear for that year once searched). Three weeks of research via microfilm is now an hour of research on a computer.

Sidney Public Library Director Andrew Sherman sums up the problem:

“We get a lot of requests from people to find information in the old local newspapers we have on microfilm,” said Mr. Sherman, “and the issue we have is, if the person doesn’t have a good idea of the date or a fairly limited date range for us to search, with our staff, it’s just not practical for us.”

Like many of our partners, Bossard Memorial Library director Debbie Saunders also knows the limitations of microfilm at her library in terms of accessibility.

“While it was great that patrons could come in and search the microfilm in-house, it wasn’t searchable in a really efficient way,” said Saunders. “We now have an online searchable index of every paper since 1895…We just believed in the value of it and what it will do for people in terms of their research capability, even if you’re not doing real in-depth research you can learn a lot about local history or family members.”

Melinda Krick, editor of The Paulding Progress agrees:

“So many times we’ve tried to research something, and it’s like trying to find a needle in a haystack unless you had a date to go by. This makes research so much easier and productive.” BUT…you might WANT to spend a bit more time on your research. “It is easy to get lost browsing through the archives.”

It Will Improve The Accuracy Of Research

Keyword searching & indexing of archives assures staff of a higher percentage rate return on finding information their patrons need. Computer searches can find people, phrases, places, and events people can overlook after hours of researching a newspaper page by page. Once your newspaper is digitized, each newspaper page will be keyword searchable. It is much more efficient than the “old way”.

Without a searchable archive, to locate a name, an event, or anything else of significance, you first need to know a date, or at least a fairly narrow date range. Once you find the right cabinet, drawer, and finally the reel, containing that date range of the newspaper you were looking for…then the work begins. Thread the microfilm reader…now rethread it correctly, change the lens…then realize the one you had initially was the correct one…then start scrolling. Then scroll some more. Keep scrolling. Scroll a bit longer… until you find the single page you want out of the 900 or more on the reel. Now locate the article. Now find the name, place, or event that started you on this journey in the first place. Then rewind the reel, and put it back, so you can repeat the process for the next item on your list.

Is there any question that things will be overlooked, or instances missed? How complete can one’s research be utilizing this method? Wouldn’t it be a lot more convenient to just search for “John Kennedy’s” name and have every instance of it presented to you, to begin with? Then (equally efficiently), have it highlighted on the image if “John Kennedy” appears on that newspaper page? Searching within newspaper pages also allows researchers to uncover the information they would otherwise have overlooked.

Toby Schwartzman, public service director for the James V. Brown Library knows that for the individuals using the library’s resource of film, looking for one particular article or obituary without the exact date it was published is nearly impossible.

“You are reading the newspaper very arduously. You have to already know what you are looking for.”

A digital archive allows you to give your historical documents a new life, and give your community an easy-to-use resource, by converting your local newspaper microfilm, and other historical documents, to a fully-searchable digital archive. The Community History Archives serve as a practical means to explore and discover content that was not easily accessible before. Preserving the historic content on microfilm ensures that the “first rough draft of history” is available for future generations. Using digitization as a supplement (not a replacement) to your long-term archival strategy opens up a very real way for the members of your community to connect with their history.

It Will Help Preserve The Physical Microfilm

We stand by our convections: Microfilm is for preservation, digitization is for access. Hard copy newspaper, microfilm, & microfilm readers wear down with every year and every use. Researching digitally is not only a more efficient way of searching, it also helps further preserve the preservation copy from deteriorating over time with use.

Caribou Public Library Director Anastasia Weigle, sums it up well when she says:

“Archivists know it’s not the newspaper that’s valuable, but the content in that paper. We have a number of publications we can’t even bring out of the box because they’re just falling apart.”
Oils from the skin are acidic and can damage film, and compromise newspaper and other original documents. Oil from fingerprints also collects dust, which is abrasive and can cause scratches on your film. If your microfilm readers are not properly cleaned and maintained, or covered when not in use, it too can be a source of damage. Dust, oils, and particles settle on the glass and become abrasive. Paper is even more fragile and less stable. Humidity, temperature variations, and other environmental factors compound the risk.

Your microfilm or original paper materials will deteriorate from the normal wear of use. Digitization allows for the reels and documents to be handled only by your staff.

It Can Protect Your Previous Investment In Microfilm

Have we mentioned that we think the microfilm reels are a preservation medium? Due to the wear and tear on your microfilm service copies, you will find yourself periodically replacing damaged reels, or losing the content because the replacement costs become too high.

We believe the microfilm should be purchased once and handled as little as possible. The more it is used the higher the chance of scratches, tears, and other forms of deterioration caused by oily fingerprints, contact with the hard (and often unclean) reader surfaces, improper storage, and careless handling. Another thing to consider is how long you will be able to source parts for, or find someone to service, the microfilm readers in your institution.

As long as your microfilm remains in the condition in which you purchased it, you will always be able to re-scan, or reformat your digital images from the best available source materials. If your film is unable to provide the image quality you find acceptable. At that point you must purchase a duplicate, borrow for an institution that may have a better quality copy, or in extreme cases, pay to re-film from bound volumes or other paper documents if you can locate it.

Nevada Library Director Shanna Speer was fortunate to find better quality film from the State Historical Society of Iowa, stored in the Advantage Archives microfilm storage facility:

“The digitization of the paper for the library will actually be done through the newspaper microfilm negatives that are owned by the State Historical Society, rather than those owned by the library. That’s because the film owned by the State Historical Society has never been used except to make a positive copy of the film. Therefore, there are no scratches or blemishes on the film, so it will allow for the best digital copy.”

However, we work with many libraries across the country that have experienced “expensive creep” when it comes to their digitization efforts, due to the costs associated with time spent locating and evaluating copies of microfilm in better shape than theirs or purchasing copies from a vendor. Purchasing replacement duplications of the microfilm is a viable option, however, our position remains…you should only have to replace at-risk film suffering from vinegar syndrome or redox. All other factors can and should be mitigated by limited handling and proper storage.

It Provides Valuable Patron & Community Service

The most important reason as to why your institution should consider a digital Community History Archive created from your existing microfilm collection, maybe the most obvious: To provide a valuable service that meets or exceeds its patron’s & community members’ needs. The faster you can find the information they need, the more you and your staff can be devoted to other projects, allowing for those resources to be directed towards other meaningful projects.
Libraries are at the very heart of your community and serve as an essential component of collecting, preserving, and providing access to information and engaging the community. There is no better way to accomplish that than offering innovative services and creating tangible ways to learn, connect, and facilitate a culture of discovery. The Community History Archives help facilitate these objectives and likely align with your institution’s guiding principles and mission statement.

Ryan Gjerde, Luther College Preus Library director, recognizes the vehicle that their new Community History Archive can serve in the library’s outreach efforts.

“We are excited that this project will unlock a significant source of local history for casual and serious researchers and genealogists, and perhaps even students in local schools…we look forward to reaching out to local groups who might be interested in training on how to use the collection.”

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Testimonials

Don't Just Take Our Word For It...

Zack Kucharski

Our archives are an important part of community history. They help us understand events in our community’s history, and help us understand the contributions of generations past from a truly unique vantage point: as they were happening. Making these archives accessible to the public is a great service to the community

Zack Kucharski

Cedar Rapids Gazette Executive Editor

Cynthia Jennings

Local history is important to our community, and having resources available online, has opened access to documents that are fragile, and in need of preservation.  Having a digitized archive has made finding relevant material much more efficient, and enabled us to integrate multiple resources within one search.  Our community history archive has allowed us to serve a global audience, rather than just those individuals who walk through our doors.  Digitized resources are invaluable, and we plan to continue to add resources to our Community History Archive each year

Cynthia Jennings

Library Director at the Old Town Public Library

Karen Sutera

We have newspapers on microfilm dating back from 1869. There is quite a lot of information in this collection from the local newspapers, but putting them in digital form is exciting for us and is something not very many libraries are capable of right now. The very idea that the entire collection would be made available for free access to anyone anywhere is amazing

Karen Sutera

The Harvard Diggins Library Director

Diane Pamel

The history of Dryden is so fascinating, There’s so many little stories, so many people – the amazing people that came through here and settled this area and created the village, the industry and the library itself. It’s just fascinating. And knowing those stories aren’t just buried in the newspaper or lost, or stuck on microfilm, and now are accessible, is just huge. When we know where we’ve been, where we came from, I think we can create a better future for Dryden. It’s such a wonderful village. The people are involved and care about it. So anything we can do to solidify the foundation is priceless

Diane Pamel

Southworth Public Library Director

Michelle Setlik

Right now, if you want to read those old newspapers, you have to go to the libraries or the museums to read the microfilms, which is not very accessible. With the digitization project, any student who is doing a history project, or anyone who is interested, can type in the keywords, a certain date and see the newspapers from their home, library, school or wherever they are. It will be accessible to everyone.

Michelle Setlik

Hall County Historical Society Board Member

Fr. McDaniel

A newspaper is a journal of the life of a people, in the case of the Messenger, the life of the people of the Diocese of Davenport. So it is important that the Messenger be preserved. This new digital archive will make it easily accessible and preserve it for generations to come

Fr. McDaniel

Retired History Professor of St. Ambrose University, Davenport

Andy Sherman

We get a lot of requests from people to find information in the old local newspapers we have on microfilm, the issue we have is, if the person doesn’t have a good idea of the date or a fairly limited date range for us to search, with our staff, it’s just not practical for us. It’s amazing how much more valuable this tool is for making that history and information so accessible to everybody

Andy Sherman

Director of The Anna Storm Memorial Library

Angela Scales

The digital archives of the Ida Grove Library is a fantastic resource for library staff, patrons and visitors. Having a searchable online database of newspapers allows us to quickly find information that would have normally taken hours of searching microfilm rolls, we can now do this in a matter of minutes

Angela Scales

Library Director of The Ida Grove Library

Debbie Saunders

While it was great that patrons could come in and search the microfilm in house, it wasn’t searchable in a real efficient way, we now have an online searchable index of every paper since 1895

Debbie Saunders

Director of the Bossard Memorial Library

Susan Pieper

We have been working towards this historic archive since the technology was introduced many years ago. It has been a long-time vision to provide online access to our microfilmed newspaper collection. This project aligns with the Board of Trustee’s Strategic Plan which focuses on five areas, one of which is Discover Your Roots: Genealogy and Local History

Susan Pieper

Library Director

Shanna Speer

We receive many requests that come to the library from people who are searching for information, and without exact newspaper dates, it can be difficult to find what they are looking for. By digitizing the collection — It will have a keyword search, so people should have a much easier time finding all kinds of old stories, obituaries, ads and whatever else they might be searching for that ran on the pages of the newspaper through the years

Shanna Speer

Nevada Library Director

Erin Horst

In the past we would have been totally reliant on an outside vendor to provide access to this important historical archive. This allows us to make these items available through our website to anyone who needs them at no additional future cost

Erin Horst

Materials Manager at the Cedar Rapids Public Library

Debbie Stanton

We are so excited to make our history available to residents both young and old, and to tell our story to the rest of the state, country, and world. What started out as a small project has gotten bigger with additional communities in our area all eager to participate. With the help of two large grants, the cost to our communities will be minimal and the benefits will be great

Debbie Stanton

Washington Public Library Director

Lisa Powell Williams

It’s been rewarding to observe patrons’ faces, as they express their delight in finding a missing piece of whatever puzzle they were researching. We hear many “guess what I found?” stories.  People often find family tree information, connections for reunions, or reminiscing about their high school sports records

Lisa Powell Williams

Adult/Young Adult Services Coordinator, Moline Public Library

Zack Kucharski

Advantage’s approach is scalable as a comprehensive project not only for Iowa, but for any community across the country. We’re appreciative of Advantage’s approach and understanding for the value of the archive and their willingness to work as true partners

Zack Kucharski

Cedar Rapids Gazette Executive Editor

Melinda Krick

It’s truly amazing what you can find. I’ve searched some personal family history/genealogy items and information for work. It’s helpful that there are different ways to narrow a search, such as choosing specific newspapers or choosing a particular decade. The matches by decade can be interesting because you can see the time frame where your search item has the most “hits.” So many times we’ve tried to research something, and it’s like trying to find a needle in a haystack unless you had a date to go by. This makes research so much easier and more productive. I have the site bookmarked on my computer!

Melinda Krick

Editor of The Paulding Progress

Anastasia Weigle

You can go online and search for anything in those papers, and you can even crop sections, add notations, and save it as a digital image instead of taking out a newspaper from 1926. Archivists know it’s not the newspaper that’s valuable, but the content in that paper. We have a number of publications we can’t even bring out of the box because they’re just falling apart

Anastasia Weigle

Caribou Public Library Director

Candice Smith

Having a primary resource is an invaluable way to get details and day-to-day information from the time period. Using a resource published after the fact is more of a review. Plus, newspapers have so much more information that you end up finding things you weren’t looking for

Candice Smith

Information Librarian At The Old Town Library

Anne Mangano

Our Community History Archive has opened a window to things. You can uncover so much more, and so much more efficiently. Historic research is hard, going through newspaper after newspaper on a microfilm machine — your eyes miss things. This archive is going to help immensely

Anne Mangano

Collection Services Coordinator at the Bidford Public Library

Lisa Powell Williams

Our Community History Archive is a valuable research tool for our Moline community because it saves the time of the researcher and makes “lost things found. One example, in working on a collaborative project with a local museum for the upcoming 100th Anniversary of Suffrage in the United States, I found sample ballots for a local election—the men’s ballot and the women’s ballot from 1919.  Illinois allowed women to vote in 1891 for school officials and by 1913, Governor Edward Dunne signed the Illinois suffrage bill

Lisa Powell Williams

Adult/Young Adult Services Coordinator, Moline Public Library

Ryan Gjerde

We are excited that this project will unlock a significant source of local history for casual and serious researchers and genealogists, and perhaps even students in local schools

Ryan Gjerde

Luther College Preus Library Director

Ann Tice

Free to users, the Advantage Community History Archive is incredibly user-friendly with a wonderful search engine and clipping tool that saves the newspaper source and info. It has easier and better searching than even some of the huge paid online sites. I love how it can highlight articles you have already viewed, which is enormously helpful when returning to a search of hundreds of articles on the same computer later so you don’t lose your place

Ann Tice

Supporter And Donor To Community History Projects in the Midwest

Jennifer Gaenzle

We love having our digital archives available and free to anyone through Advantage Archives. We have received great feedback from our patrons and even from across the country of how grateful everyone is for this resource for genealogy and history research. Staff has also found it a great time saver when more in-depth research is needed, by allowing us to search more uncommon requests easily and quickly

Jennifer Gaenzle

Fort Fairfield Public Library Director

Karen Tobin

Sometimes, a person will come to us and say, ‘I know my aunt died in 1936 but I don’t know the right date.’ So you’re searching for the reel, looking for the right one… you can never be 100 percent sure you missed it. We could be more accurate and more timely and give people exactly what they want, rather than close to it

Karen Tobin

Assistant Library Director Of The Goodnow Library

Shane Molander

Many states participating in the National Digital Newspaper Project, or Chronicling America, have had additional newspapers beyond this project digitized. One vendor that caught our interest while researching our own such project is Advantage Archives in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. They contracted with the Divide County Public Library to digitize the area newspapers from microfilm created by the North Dakota State Archives. Being a Divide County native, it certainly captured my interest as I was able to search for relatives — and even myself!

Shane Molander

State Historical Society of North Dakota

Sue Gardner

Our Community History Archive is a valuable tool for preserving and celebrating the past and guiding the future. Having access to information about the heritage of our town is important for determining our place in that continuing narrative, helping create meaning and a dynamic sense of community identity

Sue Gardner

Local History Librarian at the Albert Wisner Public Library

Charlotte Trosclair

Our Community History Archive is a valuable asset for anyone,  because it is readily available to anyone with or without a library card. We are very pleased with the services offered by Advantage Archives. It has helped us to offer a valuable resource and service to our community

Charlotte Trosclair

Director of the Vermilion Parish Library System

Cathy Beaudoin

Our partnership with Advantage Archives  has benefited us in two very important ways: 1) our print copies are no longer subject to so much physical handling, and 2) our collections are now visible and usable online so that visitors no longer have to travel long distances to view the materials on site

Cathy Beaudoin

Director of the Dover Public Library

Cynthia Jennings

Our Community History Archive aligns directly with the portion of our mission that states that the public library will “maintain and improve the quality of life for all citizens of our community by providing resources and programs that enhance and contribute to individual knowledge, enlightenment, and enjoyment in the most efficient manner possible.”  What could be a more efficient method to access information than a digitized collection?

Cynthia Jennings

Director at the Old Town Public Library

Scott Schaut

This is the first time that people can access these old newspapers without microfilm or online newspapers by subscription. This is a gift from our organizations to this community.

Scott Schaut

Curator of the Mansfield Memorial Museum

Tim McDuff

We live in a time where people have come to expect that the vast majority of information that they are seeking can be found quickly through online searches. However extremely specific questions like those we see with local history questions don’t lend themselves to successful “Google” searches. By providing access to this material online we’re contributing to our mission to provide material to our patrons in the manner and fashion that they now perform their research

Tim McDuff

Technical Services Preservation Library

Jeanne Triplett

I think one of the things we enjoy most about the digital archive is the people we come into contact with. We receive calls from all over the country looking for information, mostly genealogy questions. Helping them find their answers is always a lot of fun and we get to share in their discoveries. People are always so grateful that the information is available

Jeanne Triplett

Library Director at the Yuma Public Library District

Alyson Thompson

Our Community History Archive has given the local community easier access to the history they want. By digitizing the local newspapers, people can search for specific things rather than just browsing the microfilm. This increases the success rate of finding what content they are looking for. They may even find content they didn’t even know existed. Even if specifics are unknown, browsing is made easier as well with the digital format.

Alyson Thompson

Library Director at the Marshall Public Library

Joel Shoemaker

Our Community History Archive is a resource that allows the library to work towards it’s mission of providing materials, programming, and other services. It’s just one of the services offered to the community, whether it’s within the walls of the library or accessed remotely.

Joel Shoemaker

Director at Illinois Prairie District Public Library

Lisa Powell Williams

Our digital collection of historic Moline newspapers connects our community to events that impact and transform their lives.  It makes history come to life. People can fill in missing pieces from their memories.

Lisa Powell Williams

Adult/Young Adult Services Coordinator, Moline Public Library

Michelle Setlik

The earliest records of the history of our community are found in the newspapers, That’s really what we want, is we want people to be able to go out and find these old newspapers, and search through and find out where we came from, and how we got to be where we are today.

Michelle Setlik

Hall County Historical Society

Becky Baker

You’ve given us wonderful fund-raising ideas but even more importantly, you’ve provided a fantastic product that folks in Seward rave about. Being able to search our newspaper archives from home has generated so many compliments, especially in this year of historical significance, that I’m sorry we didn’t undertake this project years ago! It is easy to demonstrate its value to individuals and groups who are interested in donating to preserve our local history, and it is just fun to browse old local newspapers. Thank you for all you do to make us look good!

Becky Baker

Library Director Of the Seward Memorial Library - Seward, Nebraska

Sue Ayers

I want to tell you how excited we are with our digitization of our old newspapers. Now we have this wonderful searchable database. We can search so many ways, and the best part is, with the link on our homepage, our newspapers, dating back to 1850, are available from anywhere in the world! Now when someone in Michigan wants genealogy help, they are but a click away. Thank you thank you thank you. Progress is great

Sue Ayers

Director of the Clyde-Savannah Public Library

Mary Haney

We are so pleased with the digitalization and search capabilities that Advantage has provided for The Hennessey Clipper. The website is a particular plus because it allows our patrons access in their own homes, and some of our patrons are researching from locations all across the United States. Advantage has made it possible for us to be 24/7 with our digital archives and has resulted in donations for additional electronic files. Thank you so much

Mary Haney

Director of the Hennessey Public Library

Patti Smith

We are so pleased with our digitized newspapers from Advantage Companies. The Advantage staff were great to work with, always courteous, very knowledgeable, and above-and-beyond helpful!”

Patti Smith

Director - Brimfield Public Library

Shari Minnehan

We think this new website is so easy to use, and our county school teachers and students will also find it useful when doing local history projects

Shari Minnehan

Director of the Churdan Public Library

Jane Millard

Newspapers preserve the history of our communities. We have had very consistent usage of the Jefferson newspaper archive… and statistics also show usage from all other states and many other countries.  We have always wanted to expand this resource to include resources that represent the history of the whole county

Jane Millard

Director of the Jefferson Public

Luann Waldo

This project has been on my personal bucket list for years. The bound copies dating back to the 1880s are so fragile, they were literally falling apart and we couldn’t allow anyone to use them. Now with the newspapers searchable online, our history is preserved in a digital format that won’t crumble or be lost,

Luann Waldo

Editor of The Scranton Journal

Kimberly Bohnet

Searching for information on the archive website is similar to searching for information on Google.  Enter a name or keyword in the search field, and all the instances that name or keyword appears in all of these resources will be listed as search results.  You can narrow down the results by date and resource and also print, email or save the articles you find

Kimberly Bohnet

Library Director, Paton Library

Amanda Taylor

Advantage did a perfect job of reproducing our newspapers on microfilm. The price was the best, the original papers were returned, and the microfilm was complete. Concordia Parish Library was very pleased with the service and look forward to using them in the future.

Amanda Taylor

Director, Concordia Parish Library

Lola Seitz

Michelle was easy to work with during the time we were purchasing our digital material. She was always pleasant to talk to and always willing answer any questions I had during that time. I feel she went up and beyond what most sales people do. We are very pleased with the product and customer service we received. Thank you,

Lola Seitz

Director, Pawnee City Public Library - Pawnee City, NE

Becky Baker

Seward and Seward County Nebraska both turn 150 years old in 2017, so the Seward Memorial Library undertook a Sesquicentennial project to film and digitize all county papers, a monumental project for a library our size that totaled over $30,000! Thanks to the fantastic service provided by Advantage Preservation, we are already close to achieving our goal. You’ve given us wonderful fund-raising ideas but even more importantly, you’ve provide a fantastic product that folks in Seward rave about. Being able to search our newspaper archives from home has generated so many compliments, especially in this year of historical significance, that I’m sorry we didn’t undertake this project years ago! It is easy to demonstrate its value to individuals and groups who are interested in donating to preserving our local history and it is just fun to browse old local newspapers. Thank you for all you do to make us look good!

Becky Baker

Director, Seward Memorial Library - Seward, Nebraska

Sue Ayers

I want to tell you how excited we are with our digitization of our old newspapers. With trepidation we sent you all 42 reels of microfilm. They were returned safely and now we have this wonderful searchable database. We can search so many ways, and the best part is, with the link on our homepage, our newspapers, dating back to 1850, are available from anywhere in the world! Now when someone in Michigan wants genealogy help, they are but a click away. Thank you thank you thank you. Progress is great!

Sue Ayers

Director, Clyde-Savannah Public Library

Kate Lewis

Larry Eckhardt from Advantage Companies was a huge help when our library embarked upon our first digital project. We were unfamiliar with the digital process, but Mr. Eckhardt walked us through every step. He was always available to answer any question and prompt to reply. We plan on doing more business with the Advantage Company because of Mr. Eckhardt’s quality service. We are also very happy with the quality of the digital images produced by the Advantage Company.

Kate Lewis

Director, Carnagie Public Library

Patti Smith

We are so pleased with our digitized newspapers from Advantage Companies. The Advantage staff were great to work with, always courteous, very knowledgeable, and above-and-beyond helpful!

Patti Smith

Director, Brimfield Public Library

Jane Millard

I know there is always more work to do, and more mountains to climb, but I wanted to take a few minutes to show my gratitude, both as a librarian, and as a family historian. You guys all great! And thank you, also, for the shout out to libraries and all the other funding resources we work with to be able to digitize our newspapers and provide this wonderful resource for our communities. Next time I have an opportunity to visit with all the local organizations that helped make our project possible, I will share this article and show them how many archives have been preserved thanks to working with Advantage. We’re so pleased to be part of a true success story!

Jane Millard

Director, Jefferson Public Library

Ruby Coleman

We are so pleased with the outcome of the project. It was a pleasure to work with you from the start. I have been contacted by other genealogy societies in the state regarding how it is done and about your firm, so you may eventually have more Nebraska newspapers to digitize. I truly appreciate all the work that went into making this possible. Thanks so much.

Ruby Coleman

Genealogist

Sarah N.M. Harris

The Registrar’s Office feels confident with our choice in keeping with technology – going digital – and with our selection of Advantage to process our conversions.”

Sarah N.M. Harris

Senior Associate Registrar, University of Iowa

Dawn Thistle - Special Collections Librarian

So happy we went with Advantage!!

Dawn Thistle - Special Collections Librarian

Gardiner Public Library - Gardiner ME

Sharon Gonzalez

Advantage has been a valuable partner for the scanning needs of the Linn County Treasurer’s office for many years. Their weekly pickup and delivery of our paperwork is always on time and very dependable. The ease of searching their indexing allows my employees to have immediate access to hundreds of thousands of documents at their fingertips! They are a great company to work with!”

Sharon Gonzalez

Linn County Treasurer

Mary Haney

“Larry, we are so pleased with the digitalization and search capabilities that Advantage has provided for The Hennessey Clipper. The website is a particular plus because it allows our patrons access in their own homes, and some of our patrons are researching from locations all across the United States. Advantage has made it possible for us to be 24/7 with our digital archives and has resulted in donations for additional electronic files. Thank you so much!”

Mary Haney

Director, Hennessey Public Library

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